Object you used in school that you thought/didn thought you would use as an adult

edited May 2010 in Chit chat
Back when I was in school I never expecter that I would be a 30 year old man who still uses a backpack (I always imagined me as some sort of executive guy using some executive briefcase). but for some reason, no matter what job I had (even when I worked in sales...) I always use my back pack, just as if I was still a teen (and I still carry it like a teen, even if it does hurt my back...).


On the other hand, I always believes my walkman with K7's, that I carried everywhere, was going to be a technology that would last forever and ever... (nowadays I don't even use an Ipod...).

so what where the things you guys thought you would use forever or never use again?
Post edited by VanTammen on
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Comments

  • edited May 2010
    I remember always having floppy disks in little plastic cases in my bag, that gave way to the usb flash drive on my key chain, but I can't even remember last time I used that. 99% of the time I just push anything over the net.
    My rubbish website including the redrawn Amstrad schematics and the new home of the Sinclair FAQ wiki.
  • edited May 2010
    i thought an office would be full of BBC's.
  • edited May 2010
    Well, I still use the pencil sharpener and ruler that I had at grammar school 40-odd years ago, and the ring binder that I used for my biology notes - and I still have my haversack as well, although I don't use it now as it would probably fall apart, plus I have more capacious rucksacks now that I use for shopping and suchlike. I've always preferred bags that I can carry on my back, leaving both hands free for fighting off muggers or rescuing puppies (the kittens can fend for themselves).
  • edited May 2010
    an old school friend, who I occasionally talk to online, still wears the same watch that he had in primary school!
  • edited May 2010
    I still daily use a calculator I was given for my 10th birthday. Still going strong 27 years later!
  • edited May 2010
    A poorly photostated sheet of A4 paper that contained the atomic table (which down one side was barely legible and we had to fill it in with a biro). I never saw a use for this then but only the other day whilst in Sainsburys I rued the day I threw it out....
  • edited May 2010
    I didn't think I'd use a Spectrum again after 1990...
  • edited May 2010
    A poorly photostated sheet of A4 paper that contained the atomic table (which down one side was barely legible and we had to fill it in with a biro). I never saw a use for this then but only the other day whilst in Sainsburys I rued the day I threw it out....

    It's curious to see that the other day I happened to find a book of chemistry and when I saw there were new elements not included in my old atomic table ,20 years ago when I finished secondary school; there were a lot of extrange new elements, I suppose invented or discovered... my old table is useless!
  • edited May 2010
    Not necessarily, many periodic tables in schools don't include some of the more exotic actinides anyway (element 104 onwards). I don't think ours did, at least and so says Wikipedia element 104 (Rutherfordium) was made in the 1960s well before I was even born let alone in a chemistry lesson :-)
  • edited May 2010
    Winston wrote: »
    I didn't think I'd use a Spectrum again after 1990...

    At the end of 80's, when first IBM 286 microproccesors appeared, I thought how great would be to have a Spectrum inside these new computers... use it as a work machine but also as a game machine just pressing a button in order to turn the PC into a Spectrum... sort of.

    Nowadays I think it was a premonition :smile:
  • edited May 2010
    Winston wrote: »
    Not necessarily, many periodic tables in schools don't include some of the more exotic actinides anyway (element 104 onwards). I don't think ours did, at least and so says Wikipedia element 104 (Rutherfordium) was made in the 1960s well before I was even born let alone in a chemistry lesson :-)

    Was balonium on it?
  • edited May 2010
    Winston wrote: »
    element 104 (Rutherfordium) was made in the 1960s well before I was even born let alone in a chemistry lesson :-)

    Ah yes, as I believe this was discovered my a man named Mike, he and his colleges fixed cars for a living, years ago. ;)
    Calling all ASCII Art Architects Visit the WOS Wall of Text and contribute: https://www.yourworldoftext.com/wos
  • edited May 2010
    Black slip-on plimsolls. I wear them virtually all the time outside of work. just can't be bothered with laces.
  • edited May 2010
    mile wrote: »
    i thought an office would be full of BBC's.

    Nah! Amstrad Green Screens :D
    You can't expect me to have lunch with a man who's favourite part of the chicken is the right wing!
  • edited May 2010
    Nah! Amstrad Green Screens :D

    ha! green screens! had totally forgoten about those!

    I used to have a green screen monitor for my speccy (this was the solution my parents worked so I wouldn't play in the living room because someone told them "it ruins tv's").

    some of the foundest memories I have of most of the games are in green (like i still find it odd that barbarian is in colour), but there where many games I wasn't able to play...
  • edited May 2010
    Scottie_uk wrote: »
    Ah yes, as I believe this was discovered my a man named Mike, he and his colleges fixed cars for a living, years ago. ;)

    Since no one has slapped you on the back for this utter piece of piffle, a-la-Frobush stylie, I will, it made me chuckle ! Perhaps no one understood it !
    Every time I read that the oldest person in the world has died, I have to do a quick check to see it isn't ME..........
  • edited May 2010
    Tom Gale wrote: »
    Black slip-on plimsolls. I wear them virtually all the time outside of work. just can't be bothered with laces.

    You serious ? I have one pair of slip on shoes but i wouldnt wear an old pair of plimsolls from when i was younger.

    Not bothered ? Only takes a few seconds to do them up or is someone admitting to not being able to do laces ?!
  • edited May 2010
    I used a protractor once or twice whilst working for the MoD.
    Sea Kings have five rotor blades, so if you want to do a balancing plot you have to measure out multiples of 72?. It's so ingrained on my brain I can cut a pizza into five equal pieces to within a few degrees either way. Pointless. Much better with cake.
    Joefish
    - IONIAN-GAMES.com -
  • edited May 2010
    How do you get around the infernal Pepperoni completeness issues?
  • edited May 2010
    grey key wrote: »
    Since no one has slapped you on the back for this utter piece of piffle, a-la-Frobush stylie, I will, it made me chuckle ! Perhaps no one understood it !

    Well I'm glad someone shares my seance of humour if only slightly. it was terrible growing up in my teens. No one got my jokes and assumed it to be random bable, making me look like a twat, especially when in the company of females.
    Calling all ASCII Art Architects Visit the WOS Wall of Text and contribute: https://www.yourworldoftext.com/wos
  • edited May 2010
    In 1985/6 ish I got a blue helix 12 inch ruler with a pictures of Peter Beardsley, Peter Shilton, Bryan Robson and Chris Waddle on it. I was 10. It's still in use today, its in the draw of my office at home.
    Calling all ASCII Art Architects Visit the WOS Wall of Text and contribute: https://www.yourworldoftext.com/wos
  • edited May 2010
    The first thing that springs to mind are....bunsen burners, those clicky distence measuring push wheels and those pull out climbing bar thingy's that were alway flat aginst the walls in the gym/hall. I've never once used any of those after leaving school and I don't imagine I will again either.
  • edited May 2010
    Cubic units, tens, hundreds, thousands, etc.

    I never thought I'd ever use those again after primary school, 20 years later I think I was right :D
    You can't expect me to have lunch with a man who's favourite part of the chicken is the right wing!
  • edited May 2010
    Feet and inches, old weights and measures, pre-decimal money. I still think in all of these, also I can`t even work a calculator, when they first came out we were banned from using them at school, they made us think that they were an evil invention, I still shudder at the sight of one.
    Every time I read that the oldest person in the world has died, I have to do a quick check to see it isn't ME..........
  • edited May 2010
    psj3809 wrote: »
    You serious ? I have one pair of slip on shoes but i wouldnt wear an old pair of plimsolls from when i was younger.

    Not bothered ? Only takes a few seconds to do them up or is someone admitting to not being able to do laces ?!

    Yeah - not only are they super fashionable round my way, but they're cheap too. I know it's quite lazy, but the time saved is a key consideration in deciding what to put on when I pop to the shops or have to take the rubbish out.
  • edited May 2010
    I can't think of anything, so I'm just gonna go to the shops and buy a protractor and sit with it for a few minutes..gosh, I never thought I'd use one of them again.
    On those afternoons in utopia..
  • edited May 2010
    How do you get around the infernal Pepperoni completeness issues?
    By sticking to icing and chocolate drops.
    Joefish
    - IONIAN-GAMES.com -
  • edited May 2010
    A poorly photostated sheet of A4 paper that contained the atomic table (which down one side was barely legible and we had to fill it in with a biro). I never saw a use for this then but only the other day whilst in Sainsburys I rued the day I threw it out....

    I'm intrigued to know what you were doing in Sainsbury's to have a need for an atomic table.

    "Right, let's see: eggs... pasta... polonium 235... wait, will that be in the Alkaline Metals aisle? Hang on..." *rummages in pocket*
    Thanked by 1spider
  • edited May 2010
    gasman wrote: »
    I'm intrigued to know what you were doing in Sainsbury's to have a need for an atomic table.

    "Right, let's see: eggs... pasta... polonium 235... wait, will that be in the Alkaline Metals aisle? Hang on..." *rummages in pocket*

    ha ha, lol :p
  • edited May 2010
    I recently had to fix my periodic table wall poster with tippex, marker pen and pencil crayon.

    Stupid scientists, naming Element 112 indeed! :)
    My rubbish website including the redrawn Amstrad schematics and the new home of the Sinclair FAQ wiki.
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