I am soo glad I owned a Speccy

edited November 2003 in Games
Just passing the time here, and decided (after seeing some CPC screenshots of Shadow Of The Beast in a YS scan) to compare a few CPC games with their speccy equivalents..

Am I shocked or what? What a steaming pile of toss it was!! Right, now I'm straight off to CSS to agree with that troll from a few weeks back ;)

Post edited by b00mzi11a on
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  • edited October 2003
    Mind you, it doesn't stop some of the reviewers at the Amstrad Computer Games Resource (or whatever it's called) from moaning consistently about how crap the Speccy is - check out the review of R-Type for one such example, while the screaming tantrum of a review of Bionic Commando is absolutely hilarious!
    We're talking serious chip-on-shoulder stuff here (in other words, if a CPC game is crap, simply blame it on being a port of the Speccy version). Unsurprisingly, they don't explain why the CPC version of R-Type crawls along at 2 miles-an-hour while the Speccy version is an absolute joy to play.

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  • edited October 2003
    Well, I guess to a degree they may have a problem with the not-as-good-as-the-speccy 4 colour modes - but it runs at a total snails pace when using full colours. A true POS


  • edited October 2003
    On 2003-10-27 19:15, Malcolm Hope wrote:
    Mind you, it doesn't stop some of the reviewers at the Amstrad Computer Games Resource (or whatever it's called) from moaning consistently about how crap the Speccy is ...

    On a similar note (bear with me on this one ... ) I bought a copy of XBox world magazine this month (for the free full-version of Space Ace on the DVD cover disc ;) ) although I don't own an xBox. Reading the magazine I was amazed at the number of times the writers took the opportunity to gloat about how amazingly superior the xBox is to everything else.

    In fact, I do believe they were so fanatical about getting their xBox superiority message across that if they pretended to be Hitler in the 1927 Nuremberg Rally, but just changed his speech to how great the xBox is, they would have looked quite at home thank-you-very-much.

    It just smacks of 'small todger and trying to compensate-for-it' syndrome.
  • edited October 2003
    Has anyone got a C64 cartridge image of SOTB?
  • edited October 2003
    Someone on another forum described the Amstrads ultra-colourful ultra blocky graphics as "like looking at a parrot through broken glasses ", which I suppose is as good a description as any.
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  • edited October 2003
    space ace free on xbox mag? i be getting that, i got psw mag this month cos it got full version of dragons lair dvd on it, mind you it stutters terribly on ps2 but on the pc its smooth as the arcade.
  • edited October 2003
    On 2003-10-27 23:26, Spector wrote:
    Someone on another forum described the Amstrads ultra-colourful ultra blocky graphics as "like looking at a parrot through broken glasses ", which I suppose is as good a description as any.

    That is a CLASSIC!

    Words cannot describe the horror of when I first discovered the CPC version of Rick Dangerous. More colourful than the C64, but... double-pixel graphics all the way! Argh!

    The same applies to Crystal Kingdom Dizzy. Just as I was getting used to the four-colour graphics, and ever different sets of four colours on different screens on Spellbound, along comes this abomination. It's the gaming equivalent of a Kinder egg. Horrible chocolate, nasty little toy. It's a double whammy of disappointment!

    And don't get me started on Wizball - that was unplayable as well as unwatchable...
  • edited October 2003
    Bubble Bobble is another one to add to the "Amstrad list of atrocious games". Shoddy, shoddy, shoddy. Firebird software must have had cowboys in to do the conversion.
  • edited October 2003
    Ye gods, I'll have to find that and try it...

    ...and then try not to barf...
  • edited October 2003
    On 2003-10-28 02:40, Andy Gurr wrote:
    space ace free on xbox mag? i be getting that, i got psw mag this month cos it got full version of dragons lair dvd on it, mind you it stutters terribly on ps2 but on the pc its smooth as the arcade.
    Cheers for the headsup - I'll have to get Dragon's Lair I loved that in the arcade... although it is pretty rubbish to be honest :D

    Still laughing at the parrot thru broken glasses comparison!
  • edited October 2003
    Found it...

    Barf!
  • edited October 2003
    Yeah, and on the Amstrad games review page, it says something about how this is a classic game , and it's easy to see why etc etc ..

    What sorta crack are they on??!
  • edited October 2003
    Only games which are passable on Amstrad are games programmed by DavePerry,.. example Trantor and BeyondIcePalace,.. even so I still preferring Beyond on speccy (in speccy it not from DavePerry)

    yes, AmstradCPC sucks.
  • edited October 2003
    Amstrad CPC... the PlayStation 2 of its day (without the success). Underpowered, overpriced, deluged in shovelware and with the lowest-quality versions of 99% of multiplatform titles...

    *runs*
  • edited November 2003
    HAHAHA, this thread is great for me, because I owned a Spectrum 48K (Jan. '84 to April '85) and an Amstrad CPC464 (Aug. '85 to 1994). The Commodore 64 was better than both of them put together, although I would never have admitted that my C64 owning mates at the time!

    The CPC WAS a step-up from the ZX IMO, but not by much. The CPC always seemed to have trouble scrolling smoothly, and a lot of it's games looked horribly gaudy. I did play a few games on both systems (eg Knight Lore, DTD, Starion), and apart from DTD there wasn't much difference. Mind you, when the CPC recieved a game as beautiful (at the time!)as Sorcery, the poor old Speccy just couldn't compete.

    It doesn't matter anyway. I have great memories of many games owned and played on both systems.
  • This one came up in "related discussions" when I was reading the "I am currently playing......" thread, so here's a necro-bump.

    Should totally post the link to this topic over at the cpcwiki.eu forums ... but I won't go that low, a Speccy user has no good reason to make an account there.

    On-topic, I grew up with both Speccy and CPC and I liked them both, but I can't really be arsed to go into detail right now.
  • The CPC certainly was unserved by a procession of quick ports directly from the Spectrum. R-Type perhaps being one of the key examples - in a rush to get it out it is literally emulating the Speccy display file and trying to map the results of that onto the CPC's four colour mode. Hence the really sluggish frame rate (and the CPC was already at a disadvantage with it's 16K screen display), the "attribute" clash and the pop-in on the right hand side (which isn't visible on the Speccy as it's a black-on-black column).

    The more recent R-type remake only goes to show just how much more capable the machine could be given specifically targeted development, but such was the price of being the third place machine. If you look at the later games, that came from the demo scene, like Prehistorik 2, Super Cauldron, Zap T Balls or Megablasters you can see what was possible. Newer titles like Orion Prime, Super Edge Grinder and the current in-preview Pinball Dreams really go to show the potential of the hardware and are way ahead of Spectrum counterparts.
  • Refrenz wrote: »
    Bubble Bobble is another one to add to the "Amstrad list of atrocious games". Shoddy, shoddy, shoddy. Firebird software must have had cowboys in to do the conversion.

    This is true, but the remake Bubble Bobble 4CPC is an excellent improved version, very much like the arcade original.

  • Did that infamous Xbox debacle ever get settled?
    What now?
  • edited June 2017
    I had a Speccy 48K rubber keys. One mate had a C64, one had a BBC Model B and one had an Amstrad CPC464. I played the Amstrad and BBC the most, and I did enjoy Manic Miner, JSW, Harrier Attack, Winter Games and Dark Star on Sugars machine.
    Anyway - I remember 'Roland on the ropes' being heralded as such a great game.... when it really wasn't.

    Blocky sprites (nice colours though) and jerky/flickery scrolling made it seems like a game from yesteryear (even back then)

    I did find most Speccy games played better because the Amstrad never got the attention it deserved; the Speccy seemed to bring the best out of dedicated developers. Look at the scrolling in Cobra for example - that still stands up today. I can't think of anything on the Amstrad that has that kind of technical achievement.
    Post edited by Retrobrothers on
  • For a minute I though b00mzi11a was back after going into hiding for the last ten years over the Xbox scam :-)
  • Gang of Five did some nice conversions.
    Sorcery and Strangeloop were quite good.
    The gargoyle games were straight ports with the same resolution but four colours.
    Durrel conversion were pretty much the same to. Seems like the only good games were straight ports from the speccy.
    Might be worth a visit to luny.co.uk.
  • I did find most Speccy games played better because the Amstrad never got the attention it deserved; the Speccy seemed to bring the best out of dedicated developers. Look at the scrolling in Cobra for example - that still stands up today. I can't think of anything on the Amstrad that has that kind of technical achievement.
    For something from back in the day, Mission Genocide is one of the earliest and best examples. Full screen 50fps vertical pixel scrolling, something you'd be hard pressed to do on the Speccy (even if you ignore the fact the Amstrad is also stretching the display right over the border area).

    For a more modern example, Super Edge Grinder is a cracking example of what the hardware can do. I don't think anyone ever tried actually porting that although there was some discussion about whether it would be possible and getting anywhere near is a tough call on the Speccy, even if you were to redesign the maps to be more amenable to something like the Cobra scroll routine.
  • The CPC did have some great games, but yes, from what I saw on my mate's machine*, mostly it had bad ports of Spectrum games.

    Thinking back, the CPC seemed to be half-way between the Spectrum and the C64. I.e., things that the C64 did best (music, lots of onscreen colours, etc) the CPC generally did better than the Spectrum. And for things the Spectrum did better (higher resolution (smaller pixels), clean colours, etc), the CPC again did better than the C64. Offhand, I can't recall anything the CPC did better than both the C64 and Speccy. Oh, one thing, the CPC versions of isometric games could often look best on the CPC, due it having more colours in the playing area than the Spectrum and the C64, from what I remember.

    But if I had to name my favourites of the three computers, I'd say Spectrum first, then C64, then the CPC last.The CPC was a great machine, but it's game library was hugely over-shadowed by the other two's libraries.



    * Most of my friends in the 80s has Spectrums, a few had C64s, and only one had a CPC.
  • I like the CPC - There were a few friends with them, I think that was mostly due to them being sold in catalogues that you could pay up over the year, so lots of kids got them for Christmas. To be honest, its only really hindsight that makes them look so slow compared to the Speccy - back then I don't remember minding too much. The graphics were very hit and miss though, like most of the time, the high colour mode looked worse than the C64, even though the CPC has a better colour palette - all CPC's had a monitor, so the graphics appeared much sharper than computers plugged into TV sets. Old school TV's are so forgiving... I think the blockyness was amplified by the monitor, there really aren't many 16-colour CPC games that have good graphics... a crime the C64 seems to get away with.

    Personally I much preferred the Einstein - similar and fairly compatible with the CPC, but with an excellent keyboard and floppy drive as standard... like a CPC designed for someone who really likes to code.
  • Some CPC graphics using very time-critical code, where the colours are constantly being changed around: http://www.cpc-power.com/index.php?page=detail&num=12035

    By the way, I always find it funny when some of "us" Speccy users claim "high resolution" when we had the lowest. Sure, a lot of CPC and C64 games had blocky 160x200 graphics, but at least they *could* use 320x200, they just often enough chose not to.
  • Even more so when you consider that 320*200 was the CPC's medium resolution. 640*200, giving a nice clean 80 column mode, was great for programming or any kind of text editing.
  • AndyC wrote: »
    The more recent R-type remake only goes to show just how much more capable the machine could be given specifically targeted development
    That version is incredible.

    Cheeky Funster (53)
  • The CPC was a really great machine, it was a joy to code on and the external ROM's you could add to it made life so much easier.
    Having Arnor's ProText text editor and it's assembler on ROM was an absolute joy.
    I wanna tell you a story 'bout a woman I know...
  • Did the CPC have graphical hardware, like scrolling and sprites, or did they have to be done in software, like on the Speccy?
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