ARM no thank you

edited November 2011 in Emulators
I am getting sick of all these ARM powered devices, the latest being that Atari Flashback 3. They are more or less the same crap. Everything is just some cheap emulation, there is lack of proper connectors, hell, the things do not even output true RGB 15 kHz, all running on composite!!!

People should just ignore these and either get a real systems from 80s OR build themeselves proper machines with proper emulation (PC hardware obviously) and hook them through real RGB 15 kHz...
Post edited by maiki on

Comments

  • edited November 2011
    maiki wrote: »
    People should just ignore these and either get a real systems from 80s
    Which is always the best option :)
  • edited November 2011
    maiki wrote: »
    I am getting sick of all these ARM powered devices, the latest being that Atari Flashback 3. They are more or less the same crap. Everything is just some cheap emulation, there is lack of proper connectors, hell, the things do not even output true RGB 15 kHz, all running on composite!!!

    People should just ignore these and either get a real systems from 80s OR build themeselves proper machines with proper emulation (PC hardware obviously) and hook them through real RGB 15 kHz...

    I have a Pandora - mine runs at 1GHz with XFCE desktop, on a TI ARM Cortex. It's very small, with an 800x480 screen which plays all my old emulated games pretty much flawlessly.

    15KHz out is all very well, but I don't want to lug an old monitor around with me on the bus, or when I'm waiting at the local takeaway. I certainly don't want to carry a speccy around with power pack, tape deck and 14" TV.

    Besides that, I don't just emulate old games on it - I play other games too (the Residual port for playing Grim Fandango natively is heavenly, as is the port of Daphne for Dragon's Lair Arcade laser disc), and I can also browse the web via Chrome or Firefox and mess with other desktop apps too - it's a full portable computer.

    So no, I'm afraid you're wrong.

    D.
  • edited November 2011
    The Raspberry Pi will offer bog standard composite out.
  • edited November 2011
    ARM should be embraced by the spectrum community.
    We live in an age where computing is dominated by the giants of silicon valley, Korea and Japan, and ARM is the British genius that is starting to take over more and more aspects of computing. Very much in the spirit of Sinclair / Acorn etc. Get used to ARM, the British are back ;)
  • edited November 2011
    p13z wrote: »
    the giants of silicone valley

    The California porn industry? ;)
    My rubbish website including the redrawn Amstrad schematics and the new home of the Sinclair FAQ wiki.
  • edited November 2011
    Yes, the ARM is ubiquitous these days and modern implementations are pretty powerful. We've now got dual core smartphones with CPU speeds over 1GHz now, with quad core ones just around the corner, and they're capable of very high quality emulation; pretty much the only benefit of PC hardware is that you get a proper keyboard, although that does make all the difference for a lot of games.

    That said, I'm a bit dubious of this approach when it comes to consumer-level plug-and-play devices. The Flashback 2 had a custom ASIC that, by all accounts, did a creditable job of re-implementing the original Atari hardware, and for its successor to go to what's essentially a software-based solution seems like a step back. I can only guess that Blaze aren't prepared to commit to a substantial enough production run to pay back the extra upfront costs of doing it.
  • edited November 2011
    p13z wrote: »
    We live in an age where computing is dominated by the giants of silicon valley, Korea and Japan, (..)
    That is desktop computing...

    Dunno about market share in $$ terms, but in terms of pure numbers ARM is king, and has been so for a long time. Alongside of MIPS family and perhaps some 68k (Coldfire etc) and PowerPC parts. Think of embedded systems like NAT/router boxes, mobile phones, TV set-top boxes, streaming media players, many game consoles, etc, etc.

    Don't think Korea or Japan are doing much here except making products, apart from ARM most CPU architectures originate from Silicon Valley. Oh and btw ARM doesn't produce any CPU's, just designs & licenses them. Many 3rd parties do the actual chip production.
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