Spectrum in black TS1500 case with grey "Sinclair ZX Spectrum" label

edited September 2012 in Hardware
At the Spectrum30 event yesterday, someone had brought a Spectrum like object with an unusual case and I never did find out whose it was or where it came from.

Inside the case was a Harlequin board, but it was the case itself that caught my attention. It used the TS1500 case mould but in black plastic, and the label had a grey background with black writing on it saying Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Does anyone know where this came from and whether there were many Spectrums sold like this?

Richard
Post edited by rga24 on
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Comments

  • edited September 2012
    sounds like a CZ-2000 by an Argentinian company called Czerweny Electronica

    did it look like this?

    Czerweni_CZ2000_System_2.jpg

    compared to the TS1500

    ts1500.jpg
  • edited September 2012
    hmmmm

    perhaps its interweb translation, but I really don't like the look of those spectrum cases.... perhaps if they were in white as opposed to black/grey ?
  • edited September 2012
    the second piccy is actually ZX-81, from what I've read

    I was really surprised when I first saw one as I immediately thought (through my ignorance) that is was a speccy clone because of the case
  • edited September 2012
    rga24 wrote: »
    At the Spectrum30 event yesterday, someone had brought a Spectrum like object with an unusual case and I never did find out whose it was or where it came from.

    Inside the case was a Harlequin board, but it was the case itself that caught my attention. It used the TS1500 case mould but in black plastic, and the label had a grey background with black writing on it saying Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Does anyone know where this came from and whether there were many Spectrums sold like this?

    Richard

    Welcome.

    Sounds like a custom-made case or painted case to me. You should've asked someone while over there. I'm curious now. :)

    The above picture doesn't look like most CZ-2000s I've seen. This one is more like what you describe:

    Czerweny_CZ-2000.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if the owner had found a way to make a label for the computer or get one from a Spectrum case, if that's even possible.
  • edited September 2012
    Timex 2048?

    Timex2048_.jpg
  • edited September 2012
    Very much like a CZ 2000, but with a different label. Difficult to say what it had been because the original circuit board was not there; instead there was a Harlequin board inside.
  • edited September 2012
    I have one. Let me search the picture

    EDIT:
    zx48ktscase.jpg
    Assembled by Timex of Portugal.
  • edited September 2012
    Interesting!
    I have a 48K made by Timex Portugal too, but mine has the usual 48K case and hard plastic keys instead of the rubber ones.
  • edited September 2012
    zxbruno wrote: »
    Interesting!
    I have a 48K made by Timex Portugal too, but mine has the usual 48K case and hard plastic keys instead of the rubber ones.

    I have another made by Timex of Portugal with normal casing but rubber keys:
    zxtimex.jpg
  • edited September 2012
    Encarnado wrote: »
    I have one. Let me search the picture

    EDIT:
    zx48ktscase.jpg
    Assembled by Timex of Portugal.

    Yes, that was it exactly.

    So what is this?

    A PAL Spectrum 48K with a Sinclair ULA on an Issue 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 etc board? Yet in a TS1500 case?

    Where were these sold?
  • edited September 2012
    rga24 wrote: »
    Yes, that was it exactly.

    So what is this?

    A PAL Spectrum 48K with a Sinclair ULA on an Issue 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 etc board? Yet in a TS1500 case?

    Where were these sold?

    It's a PAL 48K Spectrum. I must open it to check issue number.
    Maybe Timex of Portugal run out of Sinclair casing and decided to make TS1500 case in black for it.
    People say Timex of Portugal exported to Argentina. Maybe it wasn't TC2048 or TC2068 but Spectrum boards on TS1500 case and they put the CZ sticker on them.
    I got this one on a storage unit of a man who bought inventory when Timex of Portugal shutdown their assembly computer lines.

    EDIT:
    This have a 1983 issue 3 board with 5C112E-2 ULA. SRC 119 burned on board, SRC 121 printed.
    All chips have sockets except LM1889N. CPU is Zilog and ROM is Sinclair. All chips are 1983 manufacture.
    This computer is Timex model M-332 48K with serial number P 071094 (silver sticker glued on edge connector opening in botton casing inside)
  • edited September 2012
    @rga24: They were sold in Portugal. Timex was making Spectrums for Sinclair but they also made their own thing every now and then.
    Encarnado wrote: »
    Maybe Timex of Portugal ran out of Sinclair casing and decided to make TS1500 case in black for it.

    They were already making TS1500s for the U.S.A. so they already had plenty of cases, but to make it black was a nice touch.
    Encarnado wrote: »
    People say Timex of Portugal exported to Argentina. Maybe it wasn't TC2048 or TC2068 but Spectrum boards on TS1500 case and they put the CZ sticker on them.

    Wondering if any of the CZ owners on Speccy.org would have more information about this.
    Encarnado wrote: »
    I got this one on a storage unit of a man who bought inventory when Timex of Portugal shutdown their assembly computer lines.

    You should make a book of all your findings, make interviews with people that worked over there, record your research, locate important Timex people, etc. Many of them are probably retired now and may be willing to answer questions. And there are so many questions...
    Encarnado wrote: »
    This one has a 1983 issue 3 board with 5C112E-2 ULA. SRC 119 burned on board, SRC 121 printed.
    All chips have sockets except LM1889N. CPU is Zilog and ROM is Sinclair. All chips are from 1983.
    This computer is Timex model M-332 48K with serial number P 071094 (silver sticker glued on edge connector opening in botton casing inside)

    It would be interesting to find out out that one compares to the boards inside the CZ computers.
  • edited September 2012
    Date codes of 1983, this is interesting. 5000 series ULAs, also interesting.

    This is my theory. Timex of Portugal had already made a few Spectrum like objects in TS1500 cases (really TS2000 cases), which were intended to be Timex Sinclair 2000 computers. When Timex Computer Corporation decided not to sell the TS2000 in the USA market but instead re-engineer the machine, Timex of Portugal found something else to do with the machines they had already made.

    These machines are what would have been TS2000s.
  • edited September 2012
    Now that would be something!
    I wish we could find someone in Portugal who could answer these questions!

    If someone finds these boards are somehow modified to pass the FCC requirements that the original 48K didn't pass, I may faint.
  • edited September 2012
    zxbruno wrote: »
    Now that would be something!
    I wish we could find someone in Portugal who could answer these questions!

    If someone finds these boards are somehow modified to pass the FCC requirements that the original 48K didn't pass, I may faint.

    The boards are probably standard PAL 48K boards; the TS2000 would have been an NTSC machine with a different colour crystal and an NTSC ULA. Such a board did apparently surface a while back, but probably wasn't made in large quantities. The TS1500 itself offers a clue as to how the TS2000 would have passed FCC regulations; the inside surfaces of the case are coated with a metallic substance and there are metal tabs soldered to ground planes on the circuit board which contact the inside of the case. So the whole inside surface of the TS1500 case is at ground potential.
  • edited September 2012
    rga24 wrote: »
    the inside surfaces of the case are coated with a metallic substance and there are metal tabs soldered to ground planes on the circuit board which contact the inside of the case. So the whole inside surface of the TS1500 case is at ground potential.

    The big problem is the keyboard though. Perhaps if the keyboard membrane or mat was coated in metallic paint it could be grounded.
    My rubbish website including the redrawn Amstrad schematics and the new home of the Sinclair FAQ wiki.
  • edited September 2012
    About TS1500, I already saw that different board "designs" exists. Don't know how many issues existed. Must get my TS1500 and open it again. The person who gave it to me said it was the last one on Timex of Portugal.
    http://timex.comboios.info/gallery-TS1500.html <- TS1500 owners please check this
    This black TS1500 case is not coated with metallic paint.

    If someone needs I can check all codes on this issue 3 board and even scan it.
  • edited September 2012
    Encarnado wrote: »
    About TS1500, I already saw that different board "designs" exists. Don't know how many issues existed. Must get my TS1500 and open it again. The person who gave it to me said it was the last one on Timex of Portugal.
    http://timex.comboios.info/gallery-TS1500.html <- TS1500 owners please check this
    This black TS1500 case is not coated with metallic paint.

    If someone needs I can check all codes on this issue 3 board and even scan it.

    I have two TS1500s, both have different boards. The oldest has 8 DRAM chips and seems to follow the schematic I've seen somewhere. The newest has only 2 DRAM chips and has date codes from 1986 and 1987. This surprised me greatly; why were TS1500s being made then?
  • edited September 2012
    rga24 wrote: »
    I have two TS1500s, both have different boards. The oldest has 8 DRAM chips and seems to follow the schematic I've seen somewhere. The newest has only 2 DRAM chips and has date codes from 1986 and 1987. This surprised me greatly; why were TS1500s being made then?

    That is something only people inside Timex can tell, who was ordering them.
  • edited September 2012
    Encarnado wrote: »
    That is something only people inside Timex can tell, who was ordering them.

    There definitely are interesting things going on with Timex of Portugal and Timex Computer Corporation.

    The TS1500s are all (?) made in Portugal, both the early batch and the ones with 2 DRAM chips made much later. I've never seen PAL (625 line) TS1500s made for the Portuguese market but apparently they exist.

    TS2068s are all (?) made in Korea. This is curious because Timex of Portugal was supposed to be making computers for Timex Computer Corporation. Why did TCC have the TS2068 made in Korea? Had TCC neglected to keep ToP in the loop regarding TS2000 cancellation and TS2068 design? Why didn't ToP build the TS2068?

    TC2068s are made in Portugal. Evidently ToP got hold of the TS2068 moulds and designs, and made a PAL version of the SCLD. This seems to be after TCC was disbanded. The cases are identical right down to the unused channel 2 - 3 switch in the TC2068, except that the cartridge port has been deliberately widened.

    TC2048s are made in Portugal. TCC was well out of the picture by this time.

    The last batch of TS1500s seems to have been made even after the TC2048 started being made. There was a batch made for the National Education Corporation as part of its Technical Literacy Series, this could have been that. Why choose the TS1500? Maybe Timex offered a good price for the machine.
  • edited September 2012
    rga24 wrote: »
    There definitely are interesting things going on with Timex of Portugal and Timex Computer Corporation.

    And people who knows don't want to tell.
    rga24 wrote: »
    The TS1500s are all (?) made in Portugal, both the early batch and the ones with 2 DRAM chips made much later. I've never seen PAL (625 line) TS1500s made for the Portuguese market but apparently they exist.

    Don't know how was the market in Portugal for the ZX81 clones. As TS1000 and TS1500 are monochrome, a PAL TV can picture computer output, no need to make different logic.
    rga24 wrote: »
    TS2068s are all (?) made in Korea. This is curious because Timex of Portugal was supposed to be making computers for Timex Computer Corporation. Why did TCC have the TS2068 made in Korea? Had TCC neglected to keep ToP in the loop regarding TS2000 cancellation and TS2068 design? Why didn't ToP build the TS2068?

    By that time TMX was making TS1000 and TS1500 computers. Maybe TMX didn't had the capacity to build another computer line in time and TCC folded too early.
    rga24 wrote: »
    TC2068s are made in Portugal. Evidently ToP got hold of the TS2068 moulds and designs, and made a PAL version of the SCLD. This seems to be after TCC was disbanded. The cases are identical right down to the unused channel 2 - 3 switch in the TC2068, except that the cartridge port has been deliberately widened.

    Some people say that TCC engineers come to Portugal. I believe before that, TMX didn't had a development & research crew, only the assembly lines. TMX did not only made the cartridge opening wider, they fixed TS2068 by replacing bus buffers with resistors, making the expansion bus ZX Spectrum compatible and a complete board redesign (TC2068 board is smaller). TC2068 out of the box is much more compatible with Spectrum than TS2068.
    Also TMX didn't focus only on TC2048/2068. The Timex FDD/FDD3000 was another computer that can be used as a floppy disk drive system for ZX Basic or a CP/M computer. Timex Terminal 3000, another computer to be used with FDD3000 and the missing TC3256. There are also reports of TMX working with IBM developing a high speed network.
    Both TC3256 and the high speed network were lost when TMX was forced to shutdown the computer assembly lines.
    rga24 wrote: »
    TC2048s are made in Portugal. TCC was well out of the picture by this time.
    I think TCC never envisioned TC2048. Their idea for a machine named TS2048 was a TS2068 with 16K RAM. But something is wrong in 2068 ROMs as they do not work in 16K RAM space.
    rga24 wrote: »
    The last batch of TS1500s seems to have been made even after the TC2048 started being made. There was a batch made for the National Education Corporation as part of its Technical Literacy Series, this could have been that. Why choose the TS1500? Maybe Timex offered a good price for the machine.
    Maybe because they were cheaper and the software already made for it?
  • edited September 2012
    rga24 wrote: »
    I've never seen PAL (625 line) TS1500s made for the Portuguese market but apparently they exist.

    Interesting. Encarnado, was your TS1500 made in Portugal? Do you know if it's specifically a PAL model? I only have the one that was made for the National Education Corporation. You have the one that was sold by itself with a really nice case.
    rga24 wrote: »
    TS2068s are all (?) made in Korea.

    My memory could be failing me, but I think I've seen more than one TS2068 with the words "Made in Portugal".

    I wish Andrew would join this topic. His memory is a lot sharper than mine and he remembers my conversation with the Senior Vice President of Timex better than I do!
  • edited September 2012
    rga24 wrote: »
    The TS1500s are all (?) made in Portugal, both the early batch and the ones with 2 DRAM chips made much later.

    And it's not a repair?
    Encarnado wrote: »
    Some people say that TCC engineers come to Portugal. I believe before that, TMX didn't had a development & research crew, only the assembly lines.

    I doubt many would have moved to Portugal -- killing off the main projects usually leads to engineers looking for greener pastures. But there has always been mention of a talented Portuguese engineer and it could be he went back to ToP.
    they fixed TS2068 by replacing bus buffers with resistors, making the expansion bus ZX Spectrum compatible and a complete board redesign (TC2068 board is smaller). TC2068 out of the box is much more compatible with Spectrum than TS2068.

    The buffering was about accommodating future peripherals and likely made the machine less noisy.
    I think TCC never envisioned TC2048. Their idea for a machine named TS2048 was a TS2068 with 16K RAM. But something is wrong in 2068 ROMs as they do not work in 16K RAM space.

    If you read Andrew's interview with the former Timex exec, you'll see his assertion that the ts2068 *was* the ts2048 and the name change only occurred because of a slip up in a press release (the 48 was supposed to mean 48k RAM; the question was why the 68 in 2068).

    This is not true, however, as Timex spent months publicizing 16k and 48k RAM versions of the ts2000 and had photos of both the ts2048 and ts2068 released with the appropriate name stickers on the machine. They even had pre-order forms printed in magazines for both machines. Then again, maybe the planned names were originally ts2016 and ts2048 and this is what the interviewee was thinking of.

    I hadn't considered if the 2068 can run with 16k RAM or not -- are you certain about that? It's been a very long time since I looked at what the boot was doing but I don't recall anything having to be placed above 32k, although there are several new things placed in RAM when compared to the Spectrum (the function dispatcher comes to mind, which is required to jump into the EXROM from the main 16k ROM).
    zxbruno wrote: »
    My memory could be failing me, but I think I've seen more than one TS2068 with the words "Made in Portugal".

    I'm pretty sure all of them were made in South Korea. But Zebra Systems did import new 'ts2068s' from ToP around 1986/87 that were known as the silver avenger. I don't know exactly what these were, for example if they were actually tc2068s made for NTSC televisions or what.
  • edited September 2012
    Encarnado wrote: »
    And people who knows don't want to tell.



    Don't know how was the market in Portugal for the ZX81 clones. As TS1000 and TS1500 are monochrome, a PAL TV can picture computer output, no need to make different logic.

    A PAL TS1500 would be different from an NTSC TS1500 in two respects. The 525/625 select line would be connected the opposite way and the RF modulator would run on a different frequency.

    Incidentally I have tried connecting the 525/625 line signal for 625 on an NTSC TS1500 and it works fine. It's the later board TS1500 with 2 DRAM chips and with a composite video mod it displays on a PAL TV just fine.
  • edited September 2012
    I doubt many would have moved to Portugal
    One of the original TS2068 engineers was from Portugal in the first place. This is the guy behind the TC3256.
    If you read Andrew's interview with the former Timex exec, you'll see his assertion that the ts2068 *was* the ts2048 and the name change only occurred because of a slip up in a press release (the 48 was supposed to mean 48k RAM; the question was why the 68 in 2068 ).

    I didn't make the assertion, I just reported it. Also as I understand it he still works for Timex.
    This is not true, however, as Timex spent months publicizing 16k and 48k RAM versions of the ts2000 and had photos of both the ts2048 and ts2068 released with the appropriate name stickers on the machine.

    I suspect those were mock-ups. I've seen no evidence to suggest any time was spent working on such machines after the 48K failed the FCC test.
    They even had pre-order forms printed in magazines for both machines.
    Borrowing a trick from Sinclair perhaps? Still no indication that the hardware existed. I suspect they were planning to simply rebadge and sell the 16K and 48K as they had done with the ZX81 and then had to change plans after the FCC test fail.
    I hadn't considered if the 2068 can run with 16k RAM or not
    It can't.

    As for the CZ series of machines, from what I can tell these were legally sold rebadged Spectrums made in Portugal by Timex.
  • edited September 2012
    aowen wrote: »
    I didn't make the assertion, I just reported it. Also as I understand it he still works for Timex.

    Ah yes, that is what I meant but perhaps I should have clarified.
    I suspect those were mock-ups. I've seen no evidence to suggest any time was spent working on such machines after the 48K failed the FCC test.
    ...
    Borrowing a trick from Sinclair perhaps? Still no indication that the hardware existed. I suspect they were planning to simply rebadge and sell the 16K and 48K as they had done with the ZX81 and then had to change plans after the FCC test fail.

    You misunderstand. These were ts2068 machines being publicized, not spectrums. They supplied material to magazines for several publication cycles mentioning both the ts2048 and ts2068, along with photos (the ts2068 shell) having both machines clearly marked with "Timex Sinclair 2048" and "Timex Sinclair 2068" stickers. The new basic summary was also printed in full in Sync magazine, several months ahead of sale (like maybe 2-3), leaving no doubt these were ts2068 machines.

    I don't think the ts2048 was ever manufactured, I just dispute that interview where the former exec has clearly forgotten that at one time they were at least thinking about both 16k and 48k versions of the ts2068. And, yes, the pre-order forms were exactly that -- orders for machines that didn't exist yet.

    It does need to be said that Timex was about as clear as mud around this time and it seems because of the product change (from spectrum to ts2068 ), many changes in direction were taken (the ts1500 coming out to hold onto market share, for example, while the ts2068 was readied for sale). There was uncertainty on what the ts2068 was to be called (they preferred to call it the ts2000 series), whether there would be separate 16k and 48k versions, and the Timex PR people didn't seem to know exactly what was going on either from what they were telling the magazines.

    There was a CES show in September (or August?) 1983 or so and one reporter noted Timex still didn't have a working ts2068 to show -- instead they had placed a spectrum into a ts2068 case and were passing that off as the machine. This was found it when he tried to enter new commands like 'SOUND' and 'STICK' but couldn't.

    I hadn't considered if the 2068 can run with 16k RAM or not
    It can't.

    I can't see any reason why it couldn't, aside from a bug in the initialization? I only ask because this is a really good reason not to release a 16k RAM version lol.
  • edited September 2012
    I can't see any reason why it couldn't, aside from a bug in the initialization? I only ask because this is a really good reason not to release a 16k RAM version lol.

    You can test it for yourself. Create a DCK file where the upper 32K of the HOME bank is read-only and contains all &FFs.
  • edited September 2012
    aowen wrote: »
    You can test it for yourself. Create a DCK file where the upper 32K of the HOME bank is read-only and contains all &FFs.

    I shall give it a try.. just keep in mind that there is code during power up to automatically detect the existence of LROS or AROS cartridges in the dock bank so I don't know if this may interfere in such a test (yet).


    Anyway, I thought I might share a couple of things here. I have one copy of Sync magazine with me that I just now dug out. This is the Sept/Oct 1983 issue Vol 3 No 5, which contains a piece by David Ornstein on p14 about the upcoming ts2000 series. In the opening paragraph he mentions both the ts2048 (16k) and the ts2068 (48k). He mentions the former has 2 RAM chips while the latter is fully populated with 6. This is the piece that details the full ts2000 basic, including additions like SOUND and STICK, that I mentioned earlier. But most interesting of all is this little bit on p19:

    "
    The (tape) interface is very reliable. I have been using the machine for about 10 months by now, 8-15 hours a day, and I have had perhaps a half dozen errors while trying to LOAD a program into the ts2000.
    "

    There is no way he was using a ts2068 machine for that amount of time, so this means he probably had his hands on a ts2000 spectrum for most of that time. Anyway I would call David Ornstein a person of interest if people want to find out more about Timex in the US.

    Towards the end of the article, he again mentions the ts2048 will retail for $149.95 while the ts2068 will retail for $199.95. This is what I remember from Timex's pre-order information as well.


    I also hadn't realized that Dr Ian Logan had connections with Timex/Sinclair in North America so early on. Sync (unbeknownst to me as I only saw Sync magazine on the shelves here -- in Canada -- starting in 1983) was originally sold in both the US and the UK. You can see one of Dr Logan's articles online here:

    ftp://ftp.worldofspectrum.org/pub/sinclair/magazines/Sync/Issue8111/Pages/Sync811100014.jpg


    Also starting in 1983, Sinclair User launched a North American magazine called Timex/Sinclair User. This was before Sinclair User went all goofy and the North American version was therefore still a serious publication. You can read a page from issue 3 online:

    ftp://ftp.worldofspectrum.org/pub/sinclair/magazines/TimexSinclairUser/Issue03/Pages/TimexSinclairUser0300064.jpg

    Under the heading 'Microdrives for T/S machines?' you'll see them call the ts2000 series the ts2016 and the ts2048. The same issue has what is misleadingly called a 'preview' of the ts2000 on the cover which is really just an article on the UK spectrum -- I got a chuckle from that as it's reminiscent of some magazines' software (p)reviews yet to come. The mention of Timex coming to Canada also only means Timex was setting up a sales network as both Sinclair and Timex computers had been selling for some time through mail order and third party businesses by that time.


    Vol 1 Issue 1 of Timex Sinclair User has an interview with someone at Timex. This issue is not online but I do have it in storage someplace and I will see if I can locate it in case it contains anything interesting. I don't recall it contained much concrete but you never know.

    If I can find some of the promotional materials with photos of the ts2048 and ts2068 side by side I'll see if I can scan them too.
  • edited September 2012
    The plot thickens. I've had success in the past when trying to find some people of interest, but Timex (both in the U.S. and Portugal) has so many unsolved mysteries. :-(

    Maybe I should ask Mr Lou Galie if he would be willing to answer a few more questions. I fear that those who have or had the answers may not remember details anymore or may not be among us anymore.

    I will bookmark this topic and attempt to locate Mr David O.

    Regarding Sync, I found the original editor and owner, Mr. David Ahl. He's pretty much unavailable these days. He's the one who gave us permission to scan, host and share the Sync magazine not just on WOS but anywhere. He didn't remember much about the old days when I spoke to him. The only thing he remembered was meeting Sir Clive and being offered a ZX80 (or maybe it was a ZX81), which wasn't for sale. He sent me the last Sinclair-related item he had besides the ZX80. I received an issue of the first Sync magazine.
  • edited September 2012
    name: DiskWarrior
    company: DiskWarrior
    sn: RN057447

    zxbruno wrote: »
    Interesting. Encarnado, was your TS1500 made in Portugal? Do you know if it's specifically a PAL model? I only have the one that was made for the National Education Corporation. You have the one that was sold by itself with a really nice case.

    How can I see if it is a PAL machine?
    zxbruno wrote: »
    My memory could be failing me, but I think I've seen more than one TS2068 with the words "Made in Portugal".

    Maybe the boards were made in Korea and the final assembly in Portugal?
    And it's not a repair?

    No. Its a complete board redesign. You can check on the link I shared here.
    I doubt many would have moved to Portugal -- killing off the main projects usually leads to engineers looking for greener pastures. But there has always been mention of a talented Portuguese engineer and it could be he went back to ToP.
    aowen wrote: »
    One of the original TS2068 engineers was from Portugal in the first place. This is the guy behind the TC3256.

    Need to say more? Maybe the same behind FDD system?
    If you read Andrew's interview with the former Timex exec, you'll see his assertion that the ts2068 *was* the ts2048 and the name change only occurred because of a slip up in a press release (the 48 was supposed to mean 48k RAM; the question was why the 68 in 2068).

    Yes, I have read it
    I hadn't considered if the 2068 can run with 16k RAM or not -- are you certain about that? It's been a very long time since I looked at what the boot was doing but I don't recall anything having to be placed above 32k, although there are several new things placed in RAM when compared to the Spectrum (the function dispatcher comes to mind, which is required to jump into the EXROM from the main 16k ROM).

    I removed the upper 32K of a TC2068 and booted. It crashed.
    I'm pretty sure all of them were made in South Korea. But Zebra Systems did import new 'ts2068s' from ToP around 1986/87 that were known as the silver avenger. I don't know exactly what these were, for example if they were actually tc2068s made for NTSC televisions or what.

    They were TC2068, probably modified for NTSC.
    aowen wrote: »
    I didn't make the assertion, I just reported it. Also as I understand it he still works for Timex.


    Do you know is name?
    Time to email TMX again.
    If I can find some of the promotional materials with photos of the ts2048 and ts2068 side by side I'll see if I can scan them too.

    I have this:
    ts2068-folheto1a.jpg
    ts2068-folheto2a.jpg
    zxbruno wrote: »
    The plot thickens. I've had success in the past when trying to find some people of interest, but Timex (both in the U.S. and Portugal) has so many unsolved mysteries. :-(

    In the Universidade do Minho website there is an interview with 2 persons that worked on TMX. They on relate some aspects of computer implementation in TMX and in Portugal. Questions were never specific in technical details on the computers.
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