Does a bad sequel/episode in a book/game/film/etc series kill the series for you?

edited June 2013 in Chit chat
I meant to post this yesterday, but didn't get the time, but someone I was talking to said they used to love the Resident Evil series almost obsessively, but gave up on the series with the release of Resident Evil 5, and had no intention of playing Resident Evil 6 or any other RE game.

For example, there are lots of sequels that to me are very disappointing, but they don't put me off the (to me, much better) earlier episodes. For example, Red Dwarf is to me superb from series one to six (except for a couple of episodes which were so-so), then dropped to awful with series seven. It got a little better with series eight and ten, but plummed new depths of terrible with Back to Earth. But the fact that I so dislike series seven onewards doesn't change how much I love series one to six, and I have one to six on DVD and watch them occasionally.

Jonathan Creek has really gone downhill (the second and third from last, which appeared after a long hiatus, were strangely flawed, and the last episode was awful), I didn't like the last episode of the otherwise fantastic One Foot in the Grave (no spoilers, but the episode was great aside from the main happening), the Royal Family is now embarrassingly bad (they should have stopped it after the episode
Spoiler:
), Alan Partridge did some web episodes that were mostly dull and vapid, but they don't detract from the previous three hilarious series that were made for TV (series one was his chat show, series two was him living in the Holiday Inn, and series three was him in his caravan). And to me possibly the worst fall in quality, at least in TV comedy terms, was the final episode of Blackadder; Blackadder Back and Forth. Not only was it laugh-free and strained, but it followed the magnificent (in both laughs and pathos) final episode of Blackadder Goes Forth. The end to Blackadder Goes Forth was a brilliant way to end the Blackadder saga, but now we're stuck with Blackadder Back and Forth as the (****) end instead. :sad::sad::sad::sad::sad:

The final Dean Kootz modern Frankenstein book felt rushed and empty, but it didn't make me feel worse about the previous two. The final Hunger games book wasn't too good (it felt like the good storylines mostly took place away from the book), but again it doesn't ruin the other two books. And in these cases at least I would re-read the final books. The later Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes stories lost something too, but I will still re-read them.

And in films, the Star Wars prequels were *very* disappointing (and I won't re-watch them) but that doesn't less the original trilogy for me. The Matrix 2 and 3 were largely pointless, but I still like M1. The second Mr Bean film (where he goes on holiday) was *massively* inferior to the hilarious first film (the one with Whistler's Mother), and if you've suffered through the Hellraiser films IV onwards then you know what real boredom is.

And in games, Bombjack 2, Chuckie Egg 2, Renegade 3, Deus Ex: Invisible War, Perfect Dark Zero, Unreal Tournament 3, Carmageddon 3, Doom 3, GTA IV, Duke Nukem Forever, Halo: ODST, etc were all very disappointing*, but don't stop me from enjoying the other games in their respective series.

This has turned out a lot longer than I thought (I should be doing somethine else, but I'm skiving), but my point is that a bad prequel/sequel/season/episode doesn't sour me to the rest of the series if I previously like them. Does it for you?
Post edited by ewgf on
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Comments

  • edited June 2013
    Most of the time, no, but resi evil is an example of one where I've lost all interest. Sometimes these things turn around. Burn Notice for example was very close to jumping the shark in season 5. In fact it took me another year to work up the interest to watch season 6. Glad I did as it was the best season by a mile and that's saying something as 1 to 4 were brilliant.
  • edited June 2013
    ewgf wrote: »
    Alan Partridge did some web episodes that were mostly dull and vapid, but they don't detract from the previous three hilarious series that were made for TV
    I thought the Mid Morning Matters episodes were hilarious. However he did 2 programs after those 'Welcome to the places of my life' and 'Open books' which I thought were pretty meh, and the movie trailer doesn't look too inspiring.

    But to answer the question, not really :)
  • edited June 2013
    CoD for me. Used to love it. Until (and I can't pinpoint the exact point tbh) I just decided that it was the same cack...over and over and over and over. In fact looking back, IMHO, the highlight was CoD2 on PC.

    Used to love the Champ Manager/Football Manager series however 2012 will be my last version. It's getting less like a "game" and more like a real job! But this probably has more to do with the way the real game has gone. I used to love a bit of the footy but now when I see it I just think "biggest summer spender wins!" - absolute bile.

    Total War as well. As soon as they were available they were mine...but I shan't be bothering with TW:R2. For some reason I just couldn't get going on Shogun 2...it isn't a bad game - quite the opposite I thought the settings were spectacular, I just couldn't seem to get "in" to it.
  • ZupZup
    edited June 2013
    Al?en 3, Robocop 2, Indiana Jones 4...
    I was there, too
    An' you know what they said?
    Well, some of it was true!
  • edited June 2013
    Zup wrote: »
    Al?en 3, Robocop 2, Indiana Jones 4...

    HAHA!! Yeah and them!
  • edited June 2013
    ewgf wrote: »
    And in films, the Star Wars prequels were *very* disappointing (and I won't re-watch them) but that doesn't less the original trilogy for me. The Matrix 2 and 3 were largely pointless, but I still like M1. The second Mr Bean film (where he goes on holiday) was *massively* inferior to the hilarious first film (the one with Whistler's Mother), and if you've suffered through the Hellraiser films IV onwards then you know what real boredom is.

    And in games, Bombjack 2, Chuckie Egg 2, Renegade 3, Deus Ex: Invisible War, Perfect Dark Zero, Unreal Tournament 3, Carmageddon 3, Doom 3, GTA IV, Duke Nukem Forever, Halo: ODST, etc were all very disappointing*, but don't stop me from enjoying the other games in their respective series.

    When it comes to TV series, every episode can't be good. I downloaded season 8 of Supernatural for my mother - after watching them, she had me take off about 6 episodes from the memory stick (she plugs it into her TV) which still left her with 17 to watch.

    Films.. I quite liked the Star Wars prequels, although the original films were better. I liked the first Predator film but Predator 2 was crap. Highlander 2, 3 and 5 were also crap but didn't stop me from liking 1 and 4. Home Alone 3 + 4 were rubbish but I still like 1 + 2.

    Bombjack 2, compared to the first one was disappointing. I've never played Chuckie Egg 2 or most of hte other sequels in your list. Rogue Squadron 3 on the Gamecube was slightly disappointing compared to the brilliance of RS2 on the Gamecube (Rogue Squadron 1 on the N64 was a good but being on it's successor, 2's brilliance compared to it doesn't count).
  • edited June 2013
    Voyager was a decline from Star Trek TNG, then the last 2 Star Trek TNG movies were absolutely terrible (the one with immortality granting planet and insurrection (pointless dune buggy sequence))

    The latest JJ Abrams Star Trek is terrible too, I havent seen 'into darkness' because the first one was so boring and dumbed down.

    I still like Star Trek, but I thought it was dead after insurrection :razz:
  • edited June 2013
    it's unusual for a franchise to avoid getting rinsed to the point where quality suffers. TV wise Spaced is a good exception they had the wisdom to only do 2 excellent series, instead of going on forever and inevitably becoming stale.

    I'm not sure how the US version of the office has justified having about 8 seasons when the whole premise is that the cameras are there to film a fly-on-the-wall documentary. - What, every day for 8 years?
  • edited June 2013
    I've been re-reading the Moomin stories and have to say that Tove Janson is an interesting writer. She isn't a "great" writer, the stories are incredibly "amateurish" but she uses her imagination well enough. She didn't get stuck with her characters in just one location, she had them travel all over the place instead of just having them stay in the Valley. But the main distraction I've caught now that I've read through the first 5 books or so, is how Moomintroll is a rather dull and annoying character! He's the sort of a character that has nothing but worries and wavers back and forth sentimentally. The story of the Sea Horses and his fascination/fetish with them(her) was a bit of an annoyance to read through, or rather it became that way when he later on looks at the calendar and realises that the picture isn't as magnificient as he had first found it to be. The writing of that passage/transition in the story feels very rushed, and is probably the first point in the Moomin world where I felt rather bored and nearly put off. Another thing that annoys me to no end in the Moomin stories, is the inclusion of "human" paraphernilia, smoking, celebrating human holidays and human expressions (religious ones mainly). Ruins it for me I guess, as I just want the characters to be whimsical, non-human, and to be a part of their own very-much-non-human world. It doesn't bother me that they look forward to and celebrate spring/autumn/seasonal transitions but rather that they celebrate a human-made holiday like Christmas. That short-story where the Moomins get acquainted with that holiday is a somewhat humourous encounter (as they have no clue what's going on) but it's also non-sensical given that they are non-human fantasy characters. That whole short story reminded me of the horrendously terrible Star Wars made-for-TV movie (don't remeber its name now, thankfully). But I'm not put off by the Moomin series though, and absolutely continue to love the TV-shows from way back when.
    [/ewgf-mode]
  • edited June 2013
    With books it would be very disappointing but with films it is possible to have different writers and directors so it is more forgivable.
  • zx1zx1
    edited June 2013
    After Police Academy 3 i couldn't watch the others, they were simply too awful. After American Pie 3 they should should have stopped, but i did like the reunion film from last year.
    We must perform a quirkafleeg
  • edited June 2013
    They should have stopped at the first Matrix film.
  • edited June 2013
    No ... they should have stopped at The Horse In Motion.
  • edited June 2013
    ZnorXman wrote: »
    No ... they should have stopped at The Horse In Motion.

    Didn't realise the Wachowski brothers were that old
  • edited June 2013
    STeaM wrote: »
    Didn't realise the Wachowski brothers were that old

    By "they" I mean film makers in general.
  • edited June 2013
    No, karingal ought to have been stopped before he did those cave-wall scribbles way back when.

    (There. That better?!)
  • edited June 2013
    ZnorXman wrote: »
    No, karingal ought to have been stopped before he did those cave-wall scribbles way back when.

    (There. That better?!)

    That's hardly fair...I mean you can't presume he did them all! It's not as if he signed them all individually or anything...is it?

    ...I need proof here...?
  • edited June 2013
    STeaM wrote: »
    That's hardly fair...I mean you can't presume he did them all! It's not as if he signed them all individually or anything...is it?

    ...I need proof here...?

    Careful! He's a bit bashful when it comes to talking about his early work. He might throw a grunt at ye ... followed by his banhammer of doom.
  • edited June 2013
    ZnorXman wrote: »
    Careful! He's a bit bashful when it comes to talking about his early work. He might throw a grunt at ye ... followed by his banhammer of doom.

    The banhammer would miss...I'd already be on me arse from the grunt most likely!
  • edited June 2013
    Every tv series has its bad-patch, but it usually pulls through okay. Films sometimes get a bit stale after the umpeenth installment, but not to worry, cuz there's always the chance that someone will do a remake one day. I'm not too fussed about it.

    Used to be really bugged by the stupidity and ignorance of Alien 4, but suddenly Prometheus came along and actually re-wrote the meaning of the Alien and its relationship with humans. Alien 4 is good now! How did that happen? :D
  • edited June 2013
    The problem with all these things as I see it, is that they stop writing them from the ground up, They make situations then wonder what the character would do' at which point they become caricatures.

    Let's have some Russians, Aliens and a giant crystal skull, now what would Indy do.
  • edited June 2013
    I can normally forgive a tv show but it's harder to forgive a bad book cos they're an effort to get through then

    Having said that I don't think I've abandoned a cherished series on the basis of one episode etc. Films I ain't that fussed by so I still love Alien and Aliens despite Alien 3 and so on
  • edited June 2013
    Yes if a series jumps the shark it messes the whole thing up for me usually...star wars for example, Lost - that started off great and then got silly etc.
  • edited June 2013
    The worst one I've seen for jumping the shark has to be Chuck. The opening scene of season 3 made the main character do something he would never, ever do. They quickly realised they'd screwed up and tried to rectify it. By then it was too late.

    Although it was a great series, Fringe did something, which although it wasn't jumping the shark, was ALMOST a major disaster for them. In the middle of season 2 they aired an episode featuring a main character who had been killed off a few episodes before!

    It wasn't a look back episode or anything like that. They basically decided to chuck in an un-aired season 1 episode into the middle of the season 2 timeline. There was an uproar over it. I remember looking through previous episodes trying to find if I'd missed something or not downloaded a particular episode.

    You don't see that episode on any of the DVD/Blurays!
  • edited June 2013
    ZnorXman wrote: »
    No ... they should have stopped at The Horse In Motion.

    That reminds me of a movie review I read back in the nineties, for Mariah Carey vehicle Glitter, which was sufficiently angry it stuck with me. Here it is:
    http://www.totalfilm.com/reviews/cinema/glitter
    "Leaves you wishing the Lumi?re brothers had said ******** to cinema and gone down the pub." A film so bad it makes you wish the entertainment medium did not exist :D
    ZnorXman wrote: »
    I've been re-reading the Moomin stories...

    I've recently read Comet in Moominland and Finn Family Moomintroll to my eldest daughter, having loved them as a kid. I don't mind the odd excursions into human culture. They do live off the coast of Finland, where there aren't many humans but it's in the same world. And what kid doesn't want the Moomins to discover Christmas?

    The final book of that series is very odd...
  • edited June 2013
    I could never get the hang of Mostly Harmless. But it wouldn't put me off reading the other 5 books (including And Another Thing...)
    The comp.sys.sinclair crap games competition 2015
    "Let's not be childish. Let's play Spectrum games."
  • edited June 2013
    leespoons wrote: »
    I could never get the hang of Mostly Harmless. But it wouldn't put me off reading the other 5 books (including And Another Thing...)

    You've read the worst book in the original series (And Another Thing isn't part of the series, to me, as it's so terrible)! Mostly Harmless isn't much good at all, and And Another Thing is *awful* (so bad that when you read it you think "I could have written a better sequel than that, why did they give such an anticipated opportunity to someone so utterly unsuited to the job?". I've never read anything else by the author (can't remember his name, he wrote the Artimis Fowl books, which going by this, I've no intention of wasting my time on). The original (Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy) is great of course*, and the sequel, The Restaurant At the End of the Universe, is maybe even better. Then comes Life, The Universe, and Everything, which is great in parts and really bad in others, then So Long, and Thanks for all the Fish, which is a good book but a terrible sequel, in that on it's own it's a good read (as long as you go into it knowing the Hitch-Hiker's Guide mentality), but as a continuation of the Hitch-Hiker's Guide story it's bad as it feels more like a modern day love story than comedy science-fiction.

    Basically, you should read (in order)

    The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, then The Restaurant At the End of the Universe, and if you want to then read Life, The Universe, and Everything, then if you wan to, finish off with So Long, and Thanks for all the Fish.

    And you *have* to read Douglas Adams' other two works of fiction; Dirk Gentley's Holistic Detective Agency, and The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul (read them in that order, the order they were written in), as they are both very good. Nothing to do with the Hitch-Hiker's Guide universe, but the same sort of humour and cleverness.



    * And when you've read the Hitch-Hiker's Guide books, watch the BBC series The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, which is excellent, definitely one of the best book to TV conversions ever. It's *fantastic* (though I think the first two books are better overall than the TV series), and the differences between the books and TV version, plus the excellent on-screen representations of the Guide's output, make the TV version worth watching even to someone who knows the books backwards.
  • edited June 2013
    My answer to the thread title would be a no, doesn't really bother me. Parts 1 and 2 of The Godfather are two of my fave films of all time, and the third one is pants, but I still love the series as a whole, and in fact I still appreciate the third part for just being a continuation of the story of a fictional family I have a great fondness for. I can't watch the first two without then watching the last one. :-)

    I have no problem skipping Robocop 3 when I tuck into that boxset though. I think I'm one of the very few people who thought the second film was great?
  • edited June 2013
    ewgf wrote: »
    And Another Thing is *awful* (so bad that when you read it you think "I could have written a better sequel than that

    Go on then :razz:

    Have to disagree there, while it wasn't quite up to Adams at his best I found it a really enjoyable read, unlike Mostly Harmless.
    ewgf wrote: »
    * And when you've read the Hitch-Hiker's Guide books, watch the BBC series The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, which is excellent, definitely one of the best book to TV conversions ever. It's *fantastic* (though I think the first two books are better overall than the TV series), and the differences between the books and TV version, plus the excellent on-screen representations of the Guide's output, make the TV version worth watching even to someone who knows the books backwards.

    The original radio series is worth hunting down too. I have it somewhere on an old hard drive, must dig it out...
    The comp.sys.sinclair crap games competition 2015
    "Let's not be childish. Let's play Spectrum games."
  • edited June 2013
    Vampyre wrote: »
    Although it was a great series, Fringe did something, which although it wasn't jumping the shark, was ALMOST a major disaster for them. In the middle of season 2 they aired an episode featuring a main character who had been killed off a few episodes before!... You don't see that episode on any of the DVD/Blurays!

    I'm very behind watching the series but it is apparently an extra on the Season 2 boxset.

    http://fringe.wikia.com/wiki/Unearthed
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