Clive Sinclair and Retro Computers announce the Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega

edited December 2014 in Announcements
At last!

The Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega!

Read all about it, see the videos and bid for one of the first 1000 limited edition Vegas!

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/sinclair-zx-spectrum-vega
Post edited by csmith on

Comments

  • edited December 2014
    Wow!

    Chris does the Vega run some sort of emulator or it is a hardware implementation of the original Speccy tech?

    Do you have the stored games configured to use the specific keys?

    Why have you chosen these keys?

    How will it approx cost in retail?

    Thanx
  • edited December 2014
    Sorry to ask yet more questions - how does it connect to TV HDMI?
  • edited December 2014
    100k GBP :o :o
    Will it run other games or only ZX ?
    Personally, I would prefer to buy well redesigned 128K than half (?) emulator.
    Anyway - good luck Chris !
  • edited December 2014
    It's just appeared as one of the "Top Stories" whilst I was perusing the Windows 8 news app. The story is in The Financial Times! :)
  • edited December 2014
    am loving this throwback to the old ad


  • edited December 2014
    Great to see the Spectrum again with official endorsement but I think it misses some of the key points of the 80s computer.

    Early computers were bought by parents for children to learn, not just for games. Parents often didn't understand the machines, the children did. Arguably, these days it's still too complicated for a child <10 years of age to get started even with the likes of the PI, which doesn't have the draw of games. This console, as far as I can see, has no learning potential for today's children.

    The final Spectrum of the generation in spirit was the Sam Coup?, as a minimum I think this, or a similar specification should have been the baseline for the Vega OS/emulation - attribute clash just doesn't cut it anymore. Spectrum compatibility would also be assumed.

    Which falls back to my last point, I've likely misunderstood the market for the Vega, which is primarily nostalgia, thus the reason for no technological improvements and attribute clash, so what actually differentiates it from an emulator in a custom case - pushing the nostalgia angle could be difficult as the case is actually different?
  • edited December 2014
    scunny wrote: »
    am loving this throwback to the old ad



    yeah i instantly thought of the old advert too lol

    a few things got me when i just read about this on another site

    A: i was slightly dubious that Sir Clive was involved
    B: ?100 seems a lil expensive, for me anyway
    C: copyright on the games, 1000s of em Oo
    Professional Mel-the-Bell Simulator................"So realistic, I found myself reaching for the Kleenex King-Size!" - Richard Darling
  • edited December 2014
    brownb2 wrote: »
    Early computers were bought by parents for children to learn, not just for games. Parents often didn't understand the machines, the children did. Arguably, these days it's still too complicated for a child <10 years of age to get started even with the likes of the PI, which doesn't have the draw of games. This console, as far as I can see, has no learning potential for today's children.

    I don't think that's its intended audience. It's for people who want to pick up a classic game and play it for a bit after work in a no-hassle manner.

    If you want a Spectrum to teach kids how to code, well, buy a Spectrum. They are cheap enough on ebay. There's not much point making a commercial Spectrum clone because there is already a pretty ready supply of original machines, and there are already non-commerical full Spectrum clones like the Harlequin that can fit in a standard 48K case (which are even more plentiful). There is also the ZX Uno, a RPi sized Spectrum clone which you can connect an old PC keyboard if you don't have a spare 48K case. What there isn't is a small no-hassle controller just to play a few classic games after work that can sit under the telly, and that's what this is for.
  • edited December 2014
    Agree with brownb2. SAM would be a great starting point.
    No one important.
  • edited December 2014
    They've just passed the 700 mark in a day!

    Not only is this going to happen, but you'd better get in quick if you want one.
  • edited December 2014
    csmith wrote: »
    At last!

    The Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega!

    Read all about it, see the videos and bid for one of the first 1000 limited edition Vegas!

    https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/sinclair-zx-spectrum-vega

    Congratulations Chris!!

    So the Indiegogo raised ?80K in just two days!
    Better prep for the first 10K instead of 1K ;)

    I was really surprised by the news; I heard it through mail from Hungary first, and then was really surprised reading about it on the largest Dutch IT-related website Tweakers.net (see snapshots underneath).

    What a nice development!
    I can't wait to read all details about it.

    And nice meeting you: now I finally know how you look like.
    I read the ULA book I ordered a year ago in a sigh!

    tweakersvega1.jpg

    tweakersvega2.jpg
  • edited December 2014
    As Chris describes in one of the videos himself, the Vega is bases on an ARM SOC, memory chip and micro SD card socket.
    So very minimalistic, and that's what I expect of Chris. Well done!

    vegahardware.jpg
  • fogfog
    edited December 2014
    Good luck trying to play school daze on a few keys and hall of things n Krakatoa.

    I worry it may muck up permissions for this place and a lot more denied
  • edited December 2014
    fog wrote: »
    Good luck trying to play school daze on a few keys and hall of things n Krakatoa.

    I'm afraid buyers may be disappointed when they find out that many Speccy games cannot be properly played in this device due to limited keys, including Skool Daze that appears in the advertising video.
    fog wrote: »
    I worry it may muck up permissions for this place and a lot more denied

    There's no reason to worry here. Copyright holders won't get paid, so they won't have any reason to deny games in an attempt to increase profits!
    JPickford wrote: »
    They are getting permission from copyright holders but not offering to pay. Instead they are making a donation to charity.

    They don't have much choice anyway. Considering their plan to license "around 1,000 games built-in", it would be impractical to pay for each one. As long as they plan to donate a fair percentage of their profits in exchange for using those games (instead of some symbolic amount just to avoid paying for licenses), that's perfectly fine IMHO.
    Creator of ZXDB, BIFROST/NIRVANA, ZX7/RCS, etc. I don't frequent this forum anymore, please look for me elsewhere.
  • edited December 2014
    EDITED.
    I have mixed feelings about the software payments aspect of the vega. What I would like to see happen and what I think is fair are unfortunately two different things with different ramifications. Because it's a potential hornet's nest I've decided to change my previous message.
  • edited December 2014
    I guess most people want it as collector's item in case the batch will be limited to 1k only. Otherwise it is like RaspPI in new ZX-style box.
    I wonder if it can run other than ZX games.
    Good point - really amazing interest ZX still have !
    What next - return of C64 in joystick ?
  • edited December 2014
    I like the concept of this but it seems lacking...
    It cannot recapture that early 80's magic and the lack of keys renders some game unplayable.

    Fighter Pilot and pretty much any flight-sim, School Daze for starters. How about text adventures?

    It seems to be a little half-baked.

    Looks great though, can't fault the 'look' of the machine.
  • fogfog
    edited December 2014
    if it's hackable like the dtv64 I'd be interested. e.g. adding a keyboard etc. but other than that, nope.. it's not "Halfway point" enough for me.
  • edited December 2014
    I like the concept of this but it seems lacking...
    It cannot recapture that early 80's magic and the lack of keys renders some game unplayable.

    Fighter Pilot and pretty much any flight-sim, School Daze for starters. How about text adventures?

    The 3D printed prototype shows 4 direction keys and 5 additional keys which is exactly enough to play Skool Daze (plus the on-screen keyboard for typing the codes). I'd have to imagine games that ship for the console will be modified so they work with the console.
  • edited December 2014
    Winston wrote: »
    The 3D printed prototype shows 4 direction keys and 5 additional keys which is exactly enough to play Skool Daze (plus the on-screen keyboard for typing the codes). I'd have to imagine games that ship for the console will be modified so they work with the console.

    Skool Daze needs 6 keys besides directions; and the middle button on the Vega would be needed to enter the system menu.

    Here's an idea I came up with for how games like Skool Daze could be played on the Vega:

    There would be a configuration file with the possibility of containing several keymaps. Keymap1 contains the most important controls for the game, but several alternative Keymaps can be configured, containing secondary actions.

    Keymap1
    DPAD= "QAOP"
    BUTTON_F= "Shift" #Run
    BUTTON_S= "H" #Hit
    BUTTON_1= "J" #Leap
    BUTTON_2= "F" #Fire

    Keymap2 - (Same as Keymap1 except with the following changes)
    BUTTON_S="S" #Sit/Stand
    BUTTON_1="W" #Write

    When the "R" button on the controller is pressed, the following menu appears but the game continues to run. Keymap2 is automatically selected, and the player can carry out the actions they need to. If the player wants to access any of the menu options they press "R" again, with a final press to exit the menu and to return to Keymap1.

    SkoolDazeVega.png~original
  • edited December 2014
    Did the elite Bluetooth keyboard take off, if so what about a Bluetooth connection, they would look cool next to each other.

    Then again they could make an add-on keyboard themselves, 2nd kick starter.
  • edited December 2014
    Muig wrote: »
    Skool Daze needs 6 keys besides directions; and the middle button on the Vega would be needed to enter the system menu.

    Here's an idea I came up with for how games like Skool Daze could be played on the Vega:

    There would be a configuration file with the possibility of containing several keymaps. Keymap1 contains the most important controls for the game, but several alternative Keymaps can be configured, containing secondary actions.

    Keymap1
    DPAD= "QAOP"
    BUTTON_F= "Shift" #Run
    BUTTON_S= "H" #Hit
    BUTTON_1= "J" #Leap
    BUTTON_2= "F" #Fire

    Keymap2 - (Same as Keymap1 except with the following changes)
    BUTTON_S="S" #Sit/Stand
    BUTTON_1="W" #Write

    When the "R" button on the controller is pressed, the following menu appears but the game continues to run. Keymap2 is automatically selected, and the player can carry out the actions they need to. If the player wants to access any of the menu options they press "R" again, with a final press to exit the menu and to return to Keymap1.

    SkoolDazeVega.png~original

    I like Muig's solution!
    One of the fun things on this project is to see how they're going to resolve the user interface with such a minimal design.
    Apart from incorporating a usb port for pc keyboards, I think that a trackpad to select keys on the osd could work reasonably well to play text adventures. Something like this :
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