Special mono tape recorders for Micro owners of the early 1980s

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Comments

  • Is having an external PSU just as likely to be to enable the main unit to be country independent and therefore independent of the mains line voltage, hence there is only one product for sale everywhere.

    It also enables the main unit to be sold without the external PSU, hence reducing the apparent cost of the main unit.

    There is a further advantage, in that with no integral mains PSU, the main unit can be made at lower cost, as there is no need to engineer it to cope with the weight of a mains transformer. It can also be smaller. And with no internal PSU, it will also run much cooler.

    Finally, the external PSU production can be outsourced. Further reducing cost. As then the PSU can be country specific, but may be used by more than one product, hence still enabling volume production to keep costs low.

    Mark
  • Thanks guys , some great ideas there . Where can we take it now?
  • That's a good point regarding mains voltage and supplying an appropriate 'brick' for each countries wall plug outlets and voltages. :) Also good on the cost points too.

    I am aware it would be possible to either have dual voltage (110/240 type of thing) switch on a unit, but that can lead to erm 'accident's :D , I switched a scope on once that someone had maliciously set to 110 mains input without my knowledge, there was a buzzing for a couple of seconds, a loud bang and a wisp of smoke! It was quite an elderly model however, this being about 1990 at the time and the equipment was then considered 'from the dark ages'

    Back on topic: I would suspect some of the 'mains input' units are actually voltage sensing perhaps, the expensive models. In that they would accept anything from say 110 to 250 VAC. Well maybe possible I suppose.


    As to where to take it now, this could be difficult but the models that shared the same internal mechanism. I strongly suspect the Smiths branded 'data unit' and that Alba 170 actually share the same mech as the tape counter is in an identical place for one, and neither model (to me at least) inspires much confidence.

  • edited September 2019
    Thanks for that . I have another idea on "where to take it" to!

    Take it to vertical integration (of course) . This is what I mean:-

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vertical_integration

    The Philips mono cassette tape machines are no longer available but the Bush is . Why is that? Well one explanation is vertical integration . Bush and Argos were sister companies . If you have sister companies doing the all the aspects of "getting it to market" you can do it cheaper and still make profits . That is why Argos still sells Bush mono cassette recorders but the Philips one I got a couple of years ago is no longer around.
    Post edited by harriusherbartio on
  • Forgot I had this machine

    jKDj3Tl.jpg
    I wanna tell you a story 'bout a woman I know...
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  • Wow . What type (model no) of Sanyo is it?
  • Wow . What type (model no) of Sanyo is it?
    DR-202
    I wanna tell you a story 'bout a woman I know...
    Thanked by 1spider
  • That DR-202 looks the part at least :D

    Is it (or was it, last time it was used) fully functional ?

    I cannot recall seeing one of those before!
  • spider wrote: »
    That DR-202 looks the part at least :D

    Is it (or was it, last time it was used) fully functional ?

    I cannot recall seeing one of those before!

    Yep, it still works though the volume slider is missing. I got it a few years ago with a BBC Model B I bought off a fellow WoSser.
    I wanna tell you a story 'bout a woman I know...
  • So this is the second "computer data" special . The manufacturers of the time seem to have made quite an effort to appeal to this sector of the market.
  • edited September 2019
    spider wrote: »
    That DR-202 looks the part at least :D

    Is it (or was it, last time it was used) fully functional ?

    I cannot recall seeing one of those before!

    Yep, it still works though the volume slider is missing. I got it a few years ago with a BBC Model B I bought off a fellow WoSser.

    Great. :)

    Interesting you mention the B actually as about 4-5 years ago I gave ( yes! free! :D ) two machines away to fellow Wos members on here, although I can recall one name I cannot recall the other. Still nice to meet people as I can't really get out that often these days. :)

    I never had much luck with the ANF03 (the one that looks like the TR30) but it was a GreenWeld surplus purchase in the early 90's iirc. Less luck with the ALF03 (the one that looks vaguely like the CBM cassette unit, best way I can describe it) although they both 'looked the part'

    I did have a cursory Google for other makers / models that "looked" similar to your DR-202 but could not really see anything, again this one really looks the part. If I had to say anything negative I'd say it might look better in dark grey or black but that's a silly comment really. :)
    Post edited by spider on
  • So this is the second "computer data" special . The manufacturers of the time seem to have made quite an effort to appeal to this sector of the market.
    I suspect some of those buying these type of models would either be erm 'more professional' and wanting a dedicated tape machine for their computer, or possibly those with a slightly dodgy mono tape deck who suffered problems with loading generally.

    There's also the thought here that certain shops / outlets may of either bundled one of those units in with a new computer (not that likely?) or offered it at a discount *if* purchased at the same time as a new computer perhaps (more likely?) :)
  • edited November 2019
    Forgot I had this machine

    jKDj3Tl.jpg

    @rich_chandler: Do you know what 'ADSS' stands for or what does it do?
    I mean, the button on the far right seems to have 3 positions (do they light up?)
    Post edited by Renegade on
  • Renegade wrote: »
    Do you know what 'ADSS' stands for or what does it do?
    I mean, the button on the far right seems to have 3 positions (do they light up?)

    It stand for Automatic Data Search System. (Clickity-click.)
    Every man should plant a tree, build a house, and write a ZX Spectrum game.

    Author of A Yankee in Iraq, a 50 fps shoot-’em-up—the first game to utilize the floating bus on the +2A/+3,
    and zasm Z80 Assembler syntax highlighter.
    Member of the team that discovered, analyzed, and detailed the floating bus behavior on the ZX Spectrum +2A/+3.

    A few Spectrum game fixes.
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  • edited November 2019
    Thanks again!

    Also, found this review of the recorder:

    http://www.russelldavis.org/CamputersLynx/files/Newsletters/NLUG/LUG_issue_1.pdf

    Interesting that ADSS feature but could it be useful with the spectrum? :-?
    Post edited by Renegade on
  • edited June 4
    :)

    Timex TS2020 Program Recorder

    5FRkysc.gif
    The TS2020 is a simple cassette recorder, with built-in loudspeaker, tape counter, tone control and VU meter, designed for use with any of the Timex systems introduced to North America. The technical specifications of the TS2020 are:

    Output Power: 500mw.
    Speaker: 2in (50mm).
    Impedance: 8 Ohms.
    Tape Speed: 1-7/8in (4.75cm) per second.
    Frequency Response: 200-6300Hz.

    Power Supply: The TS2020 can be powered by batteries, or an (optional) AC Adaptor.
    Input: 6V DV via 4 'AA' Batteries or 120V AC, 60Hz

    The TS2020 was originally introduced at a cost of $49.95.

    Can't say I've seen one for real "in the plastic" here, but I'd probably suggest the internal mech is shared with a few other manufacturers anyway. Probably.
    Post edited by spider on
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