Subject Areas That the Spectrum did not "get into"


Yup, the Speccy covered a lot of ground but regrettably it did not "get into" these areas :- Psycholinguistics , Philology , and Sociometry . Any other "massive gaps"? Maybe Aerodynamics?
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  • To be quite sure about that you'd need to make enquiries of those who were in college studying such areas circa 1982. Because I used mine at college to do video titling and remote control oh and a short bit of Statistics (thank God they dropped that requirement).

    Also in the USA there were quite a few radio hams who used the ZX81 or the TS2068, in fact it was Martin who founded WoS that tipped me off about radio hams being a possible source for TS2068 stuff and I went to one such gathering in Brooklyn where I got my first kit modem! Another in New Jersey donated software to my collection.

    The point I'm trying to make is that students who were looking for some way to help them either with an idea for a project or simply to store or print out text relating to the research required for their studies might very well have created some programs of their own for that purpose.
  • Pr0n
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  • edited September 2019
    Yup, the Speccy covered a lot of ground but regrettably it did not "get into" these areas :- Psycholinguistics , Philology , and Sociometry . Any other "massive gaps"? Maybe Aerodynamics?


    Wasn't there a Glider simulator program in the Sinclair catalogue? Perhaps not quite aerodynamics though.

    Another area was that wasn't explored much was Bio-rhythms, but I wondered at the time if that was just pseudo science (I think now it might not be) and then I wondered even if it is really is something that can be studied is this Spectrum application of it working stuff out correctly or is it just pretending. I mean all you had to enter was your date of birth and it started plotting emotional and intellectual graphs of your Biorhythms - so like how'd it tell that "by just looking at my face?" So I kind of steered clear of it after trying it a couple of times. As I say I think there might be something in emotional and intellectual and physical cycles but it needs to be separated from the pseudo-science.

    Other areas, was there much in Expert Systems for the Spectrum?

    What way would Philology be made into a computer application - i know its to do with the study of words but need to know more about it?
    Post edited by dmsmith on
  • edited September 2019
    A woodworking package (was there any?) would have been useful. With 3D representations and able to simulate different joints, it could have produced cutting lists and what not.
    Post edited by dmsmith on
  • Mutant zombie chickens. their attack patterns and habitat on Mars. Never happened ;)
    Deep learning. For obvious reasons.
    Bricklaying.
    Haynes Manuals
    Might be worth a visit to luny.co.uk.
    Thanked by 1spider
  • Luny wrote: »
    Mutant zombie chickens. their attack patterns and habitat on Mars. Never happened ;)
    Deep learning. For obvious reasons.
    Bricklaying.
    Haynes Manuals

    Bricklaying? What about Through the Wall? ;-)

  • Politics :-p
  • Chunky pixels ;)
    Website: Tardis Remakes / Mostly remakes of Arcade and ZX Spectrum games.
    My games for the Spectrum: Dingo, The Speccies, The Speccies 2, Vallation, SQIJ.
    Twitter: Sokurah
  • I wanna tell you a story 'bout a woman I know...
  • edited September 2019
    Manga cartoons,

    Vintage computer emulation (imagine a ZX Spectrum emulating a computer from the 50s or 60s),

    Incontinence,

    Advanced Baked Bean Simulator.
    Post edited by Scottie_uk on
    Calling all ASCII Art Architects Visit the WOS Wall of Text and contribute: https://www.yourworldoftext.com/wos
  • edited September 2019
    I am sure there was something on Building. And with all those Flight Simulators I should not have put in Aerodynamics! I know Paleoanthropology!
    Post edited by harriusherbartio on
  • Brown graphics (C64)
    Might be worth a visit to luny.co.uk.
  • Genome Sequencing.
    Calling all ASCII Art Architects Visit the WOS Wall of Text and contribute: https://www.yourworldoftext.com/wos
  • Luny wrote: »
    Brown graphics (C64)
    The issue 1 and 2 can do brown if the presets (variable resistors) are maladjusted! :))

    Mark
  • And not forgetting phenomenology:-

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenomenology

    I bet that could count shades of brown
  • mik3d3nch wrote: »
    Also in the USA there were quite a few radio hams who used the ZX81 or the TS2068, in fact it was Martin who founded WoS that tipped me off about radio hams being a possible source for TS2068 stuff and I went to one such gathering in Brooklyn where I got my first kit modem! Another in New Jersey donated software to my collection.

    I lived in Brooklyn, NY and Newark, NJ for a few months in 1995. When did this gathering take place? I was still discovering the internet and didn't find WOS until years later. I have a collection of pictures of a great Sinclair meet in the Midwest, but that was in 1987, 8 years before I moved from Portugal to the U.S.

    If you lived in any of those states, maybe you have Timex computer info that no one has shared before? There are many unanswered questions. Two people from Zebra were not kind and I won't ever try to talk to them again. Can't find anyone from the Long Island Sinclair Timex group, to find out if it's really true a company there imported the 48K, and already got all the info I could from Lou Galie (senior Vice President of Timex) before he retired, and don't want to bother him anymore.

    I tend to go off-topic here, but there are many mysteries unsolved. I found Victor, the head of Timex computer hardware (who until recently worked at Microsoft), but I lost contact with him before I had a chance to ask questions. Maybe he retired and decided he didn't have time to deal with interviews. There's a former Zebra employee who told me he'd like to chat about the Zebra days, but I lost the willpower to research this stuff.
  • 1024MAK wrote: »
    Luny wrote: »
    Brown graphics (C64)
    The issue 1 and 2 can do brown if the presets (variable resistors) are maladjusted! :))

    Mark


    Oooo I never knew that. Are those the little components that can be tweaked with a screw driver?

    Is there anything else one can tweak on the circuit board - I like tweakable electronics.
  • Not without adding some extra gubbins!

    Mark
  • Brown gubbins or brown dubbin? I am am confused about how to "loosen up" the presets!
  • morph wrote: »
    Pr0n
    Nope, there's a very healthy 'adult's section in the archive on this very site
    Professional Mel-the-Bell Simulator................"So realistic, I found myself reaching for the Kleenex King-Size!" - Richard Darling
  • But of course the Speccy did get into an awful lot of areas that , from a purely commercial or business perspective , it should perhaps not have gotten into . In other words ,it was a training area for software developers and they made commercial mistakes .In the UK nowadays there is a lot of "harking back" to the "great days" of the Second World War . So I have an opportunity to parody Winston Churchill , along the lines of:-"Never again in human history or endeavour , would so much computer software be written by so MANY ,for the benefit of so FEW"! A lot of it was a commercial failure. And so , after the ZX Spectrum ,there was a much reduced output on EDUCATION software are the focus shifted almost entirely to GAMES

  • Its the same then as the dot com boom, a lot of ideas and businesses that did not make commercial sense.

    The same as the mobile apps boom too.
    Calling all ASCII Art Architects Visit the WOS Wall of Text and contribute: https://www.yourworldoftext.com/wos
  • Hospital management, fun parks and Civ-style games.
    We must perform a quirkafleeg
  • Scottie_uk wrote: »
    Its the same then as the dot com boom, a lot of ideas and businesses that did not make commercial sense.

    The same as the mobile apps boom too.

    Role on the next one which hopefully will involve software ;)
    Might be worth a visit to luny.co.uk.
  • And so , after the ZX Spectrum ,there was a much reduced output on EDUCATION software...
    But there was shed loads of education software for one of the competitor computers...

    Mark
  • Hi Mark

    You mean the BBC . But this was a simultaneous problem that the BBC micro shared with the Speccy - perhaps to an even greater extent (sorry I forgot to mention this BBC aspect) . So I should rephrase it to include both the BBC and the Spectrum , as the same "commercial mistake" applied , arguably , to both micros at the same time (I hope this clarifies this aspect).
  • edited September 2019
    Not really.

    The Acorn BBC Micro was during the early to mid 1980s the established computer in most schools.

    Acorn then launched the Acorn Election, which could run any BBC BASIC program that did not use MODE 7. Lots were sold for use in the home. So programs that ran on both the BBC Micro and the Election were sold to both markets.

    Acorn then followed up the BBC Micro with the BBC Master 128. Which could run any well behaved program or application (by well behaved, I mean it used official system calls rather than directly accessing the hardware).

    Then Acorn moved into 32 bit computing with the Acorn Archimedes range. Which could run BBC BASIC programs. And because some schools replaced BBC Micros/Master 128s with Archimedes, there was now a new platform for the educational publishers to sell to.

    Combine this with schools that can’t afford to upgrade to newer computers, and the lifespan of the educational software in this area was surprisingly long.

    Whereas, the educational software on the ZX Spectrum started off well, as the market grew. But later on the Speccy became primary a games machine. How many schools bought ZX Spectrums after 1984? Not many I expect. So the only educational market was for use at home. And by that time, I think it would be increasingly hard for children to persuade parents that they needed a ZX Spectrum for educational reasons...

    I can’t see many kids themselves buying educational programs, so that just left a “small” number of parents for the market to sell to...

    Mark
    Post edited by 1024MAK on
  • edited September 2019
    ZXbruno? Sorry it took me so long to reply - I'd given up on this thread!
    I was on Long Island from about late 84 to 86 after which I moved to VA but by 85 I'd already gone over to Amiga and the failthful TS2068 went into a cardboard box never to be seen again circa 2001 thanks to my alcoholic ex who chucked out all my computers except the laptop I got from the school. Well you dont use them anymore....bitch. Pure spite.

    I didnt belong to any Timex Sinclair groups, didnt even know there were any but I was up to my ears running a BBS from that Timex 2068 or trying to because at 300 baud it wasnt much to speak of.

    I really liked that TS2068 and wanted to adapt it to use in school to build and run robotic demos, then Lego came out with their weird system and I had to use that because the school bought the whole system, gears and everything, it was actually pretty good but the software sucked.
    Post edited by mik3d3nch on
  • Ok I really will have to broaden it out a lot to include the BBC , the Acorn Electron , and the Archimedes . But basically after this initial flourish and burst of activity , with educational a software , headed up by worthies of the time , this sector became very much "second division" with games at the top ; this was to some extent at least against the run of some peoples' expectations .

    I agree I oversimplified what we already know that the serious side of it was never (in terms of its business potential) considered after that to be a serious rival to games ever again. My point is that generally , educational software was never in the "big league" again after these early hopes were diminished . After the initial burst of new software in 1983-84, commercial expectations for this area were much lower . The sector never matched these early initial hopes for it .

    But this is a benefit . If the true picture had been figured out straight away this stuff would never ever have been produced - the risks of losing a lot of cash in this area were too high for it to be repeated .

    My main point is that the Speccy actually benefited from all this material that would never have been produced if its true worth , in business terms , had been correctly predicted . So arguably it was unique . I am not saying that "You Tube" does not do a great job . But the form in which the material is supplied has changed forever .

    Maybe this is such an obvious point that people probably do not think it worth stating.
  • What I think would have been neat in 1982, would be to see a series of Apple style 'there's an app for that' advert of a woman (or man) making a lovey cake in their kitchen and then what's shown at the end is that the cook is being guided by her ZX Spectrum which does the recipes and steps required.

    I'm sure there could be countless other 'there's an app for that ' style adverts. I think that could have pushed the ZX spectrum more in to markets that were beyond the traditional 'We brought it for their homework (cough and the games)".
    Calling all ASCII Art Architects Visit the WOS Wall of Text and contribute: https://www.yourworldoftext.com/wos
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