+3 joystick port - replacement

One of the joystick ports on my +3 doesn't always recognise my joystick movements. It's probably a loose connection from either a loose connection (resolder?) or I need a new port. What's the best way to get a new port? It's a 9 pin socket, but is it a standard one?

Cheers

Comments

  • It’s likely a cold solder joint (or several cold solder joints). It’s doubtful that a D-sub connector could be physically damaged.

    It is, however, a standard right-angled D-sub male connector, although I doubt you could find an exact replacement nowadays. Pretty much all of them come with a metal casing, and the leads could extend to a different length. If worse comes to worst, you might want to replace both connectors (for esthetic reasons).
    Every man should plant a tree, build a house, and write a ZX Spectrum game.

    Author of A Yankee in Iraq, a 50 fps shoot-’em-up—the first game to utilize the floating bus on the +2A/+3,
    and zasm Z80 Assembler syntax highlighter.
    Member of the team that discovered, analyzed, and detailed the floating bus behavior on the ZX Spectrum +2A/+3.

    A few Spectrum game fixes.
  • The PCB mounting D connectors as used on the +2A, +2B +3 etc. were ‘standard’ parts at the time. However, now, it’s difficult to find the same type (black plastic body) and the commonly available PCB mounting right angle D connectors have their leads with the bend in them in a different place.

    D connectors are normally fairly reliable, but if some looney shoved a joystick in with far too much force, it is possible for the leads to break.

    Mark
  • edited July 18
    I thought one of the usual retro harware places would have something suitable but a cursory look did not show anything.

    I guess its maybe off to Ebay to try to find something suitable as 1024MAK has indicated the modern ones are not usually quite the same.

    This does present an opportunity though if needed to perhaps -ahem- rewrite them to the standard 'Atari' pinout perhaps.
    Post edited by spider on
  • 1024MAK wrote: »
    The PCB mounting D connectors as used on the +2A, +2B +3 etc. were ‘standard’ parts at the time. However, now, it’s difficult to find the same type (black plastic body) and the commonly available PCB mounting right angle D connectors have their leads with the bend in them in a different place.

    D connectors are normally fairly reliable, but if some looney shoved a joystick in with far too much force, it is possible for the leads to break.

    Mark

    Thanks for the helpful advice guys.

    The spectrum was originally owned by someone with fat hands, as there is a piece missing on the plastic "d"
    . However the pins look good externally so let's hope it's just a dry joint.

    When you say the standard connector's bends are in the wrong place, if needed could a standard connector be used, or is it a non starter?

    Cheeers
  • Sorry, can’t actually remember. One of the ZX Spectrums that I obtained off eBay around seven years ago had one D-connector that had been glued back in place. Needless to say, all the pins at the bend where they go through the board were broken and gluing it did not help with reconnecting these from an electrical perspective!

    I managed to get the same type from a company that bought abandoned and broken computers and recovered selected parts off the boards. I did buy various brand new right angle D-connectors (male plugs), but none fitted correctly. And no, I cannot remember the name of the company I got my spare D-connector from.

    Mark

  • Would guess the best plan now maybe to follow one of the guides that is intended for 'rewiring' them as regular Atari type pinouts and assuming the guide shows replacement sockets, either see via the pics how they mounted/fixed them properly*** and either wire that way or in the SJS erm 'style' , does look a tad messy with a few bits of wire though, but works well enough.

    *** I'm assuming the actual physical mountings have not really changed.
  • Found some photos...

    0-ADF9-F01-521-E-447-D-8-C97-53-E4664-ADE12.jpg

    45490-C6-D-8098-4052-A911-874-F04-B3-BBF6.jpg

    E3-B75886-0-F9-D-4-F7-A-B281-31725994-FD12.jpg

    Mark
  • edited July 24
    These look like they could be long enough. No mounting base, though:

    46e1e4b8-7d6a-4138-a5d0-c26855320dda_1.b4a1e2489ae062d083cdc30bb6ed9cf7.jpeg

    Oh, how about this?

    db9-connector-pcb-male-312008.jpg
    Post edited by Ast_A_Moore on
    Every man should plant a tree, build a house, and write a ZX Spectrum game.

    Author of A Yankee in Iraq, a 50 fps shoot-’em-up—the first game to utilize the floating bus on the +2A/+3,
    and zasm Z80 Assembler syntax highlighter.
    Member of the team that discovered, analyzed, and detailed the floating bus behavior on the ZX Spectrum +2A/+3.

    A few Spectrum game fixes.
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